Employee Spotlight

Noel Raley

Applications Engineer // Master of Computer Science


Where are you from and how did you end up at Krumware?

I’m from the tiny town of Jefferson, SC and I ended up getting both my bachelor’s degree and master’s degree (both in Computer Science) at the University of South Carolina. As I started graduate school, two of my friends were working at Krumware at the time and they recommended the company to me. I started my internship during graduate school and started working full-time shortly after graduation (after a European vacation).

European vacation? Tell me more!

I went to a music festival called Primavera Sound in Barcelona for the first few days, then France, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, and England. My biggest tip for traveling to Europe from the US would be finding the cheapest places to fly in/out. Traveling inside of the EU is relatively cheap, so the majority of travel expenses will be getting there and back.

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go?

Antarctica. I’d like to visit all of the continents (currently at 3 out of 7) at least once, and Antarctica seems like the hardest to access.

You’re a self-described craft beer enthusiast. For the beer drinker who’s trying to venture out into more craft beers, where in Columbia would you recommend?

The Whig is my favorite restaurant/bar in Columbia. They will usually have a good selection of craft beers on draft and some of the best burgers in Columbia.
Columbia also has some great breweries. My favorite is Columbia Craft Brewing Company. They usually have a pretty wide variety of styles and an especially wide variety of fun/experimental sour beers.
If you’re just looking to pick up a six-pack, crowler, or growler, Bottles Beverage Superstore has a wide variety of beer and knowledgeable staff who can help you find something you’ll like.

I understand that you enjoy brewing your own beer. Can you tell me more about that hobby?

Yeah, I would say that it’s natural for anyone who loves craft beer to want to try brewing their own. While I was in college I brewed a couple of times with my roommates and I’ve continued brewing occasionally since then. It is sometimes challenging to brew in apartments with coil stoves and difficulty hooking up to water, but I’ve been able to make it work for small batches and I’m hoping to upgrade my setup soon.

How successful are your homebrews? Everyone I know who has attempted it ends up with a beverage that’s questionable at best.

I would personally say they’re good; not great. So far I have brewed two American pale ales, an IPA, and a sour/gose. They’ve all been drinkable, and I think they’re improving the more practice I get. I drink my own homebrew, so it can’t be that bad. I think next I’m going to try a sour/gose with fruit added, and then maybe a hefeweizen.

In the office, you’re known for your floral print button-downs. When did you adopt your signature style?

It was around Fall of 2019, I was at Lenox Square Mall shopping for a wedding and I found one long-sleeved floral button-down shirt that I loved. After wearing that shirt until it started to fade, I ordered more including another exact copy of that shirt and some short-sleeved florals as well. I would describe my style as slightly more formal than Hawaiian shirts, but only slightly.

What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of work?

I love traveling to new places. I play video games, board games, and TTRPGs. I’ve recently gotten into 3D printing and 3D modeling. I like anything that allows me to exercise my creativity.

Can you tell me about your D&D character(s)?

The only character I’m currently playing is a Dwarf teenager named Jimothy Johnson. His personality is very much an introvert and a nerd, but his class is a Barbarian, so I guess you could say he embodies the concept of nerd rage. He also has skill proficiencies in Arcana and History to reflect the nerdiness. I like building characters that defy classic D&D class/race stereotypes.

Lastly, what is the biggest lesson you’ve learned since starting your career?

Writing maintainable code. In academia, code is often written once for one person to use a handful of times. In user-facing products, code must be engineered to be easy to read, use, and modify by any number of people.